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This content does not have an Arabic version. Sections Programs Overview M. Overview Arizona Florida Minnesota. Bold advances in medical education Mayo Clinic School of Medicine's bold new advances in medical education and its dynamic, personalized learning environment will set you and your education apart.

Students who revolutionize health care Mayo Clinic School of Medicine integrates health care, research and science of health care delivery experiences to empower students to revolutionize health care.

Unparalleled learning opportunities Mayo Clinic School of Medicine students acquire experiences across a spectrum of patient populations in multiple practice settings. Medical education redefined Mayo Clinic School of Medicine is the first in the nation to integrate a science of health care delivery certificate program into medical degree training.

Play Video The world is waiting. Play Video Virtual walkthrough: Choosing Mayo Clinic School of Medicine. Fresh greens also make simple additions to salads, curries and casseroles. Oats will forever have a place in the health food hall of fame, as they were the first food to have a label showing an FDA health claim. In January , the labels said that oatmeal may reduce the risk of heart disease, when combined with a low-fat diet. Oats have been linked with improved cholesterol levels, body weight and blood pressure.

And as a fiber-rich food, oats have the added benefit of being quite filling. A bowl of steel cut oats for breakfast is sure to keep you full all the way until lunch.

To make oatmeal even healthier, use low-fat milk or water instead of whole milk, and top it with fresh fruit. Flaxseed has been used since ancient times and for good reason! Flaxseed contains rich amounts of fiber and a gummy material called mucilage -- which helps in the digestive process -- and are the top plant source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s play an important role in heart health and brain function and may help reduce menopausal symptoms, such as mood swings and hot flashes.

To reap these benefits, add ground flaxseeds to smoothies, yogurt, cereals and baked goods. You can find flaxseed in most health food stores in various forms, such as oil and capsules. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends keeping flaxseed oil refrigerated and using whole flaxseeds within 24 hours of grinding them.

With about calories per fruit, mangos are high in fiber containing nearly 4 grams of fiber per average-size fruit and antioxidants including vitamin C and beta-carotene. In a study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, researchers observed the effects of mango extracts on noncancerous cells and cells associated with colon, prostate and breast cancer. They found that the extracts helped the healthy cells stay cancer free and reduced the growth of cancer cells. The Haden and Ataulfo varieties showed particularly strong benefits.

Barley is an overlooked grain with profound health benefits, according to Nicholas Perricone, M. The low-glycemic whole grain that looks like tiny rice is quite filling and contains large amounts of vitamin E, niacin and soluble fiber.

Soluble fiber improves digestion and helps the body better metabolize carbohydrates, cholesterol and fats. To prepare barley, rinse it and boil it in water until it's soft. Once drained, add to soups, casseroles and salads.

Or enjoy it as a hot breakfast cereal. Did you know that the average American consumes 20 pounds of pasta noodles each year? Whole grain pasta contains all nutritious parts of the original grain, making it a valuable source of B vitamins, iron, protein and fiber. One cup of cooked whole wheat spaghetti provides 6 grams of fiber and 7 grams of protein. To make sure that you get truly whole wheat pasta, choose pastas labeled percent whole grain, or choose pastas that list whole grains, such as whole wheat, spelt or brown rice, as the top ingredient.

Lycopene, a potent antioxidant, is linked with a reduced risk for prostate and breast cancer. Red fruits and vegetables are also prime sources of flavonoids, which reduce inflammation, according to registered dietitian Susan Bowerman. Tomato sauce ups the nutritional power of many healthy dishes, including whole wheat pasta dishes and veggie pizza prepared with a whole grain crust. Artichokes are more than just unusually-shaped, fun-to-eat foods.

One medium-size artichoke provides more than 10 grams of fiber, plus potassium, folate, magnesium and vitamin C. Because sweating and dehydration lower potassium levels, potassium-rich foods are particularly important in hot weather and following heavy exercise. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends buying artichokes that have tight leaves and a dark green color.

Store them in a plastic bag in your refrigerator for up to three days and wash them before cooking. If preparing fresh artichokes seems a bit intimidating or time consuming, add frozen or water-packed canned artichokes to your salads and pasta dishes. Bananas are so nutritious that registered dietitian Tara Gidus considers them a superfood.

The electrolytes in bananas, including potassium, guard against dehydration. The 3 grams of fiber contained per serving promotes fullness, making it a useful between meal snack. For a treat, she suggests grilling bananas, peel on, for five minutes per side. The peel will blacken, but the insides turn into caramelized goodness.

Are you on a low-carb diet? Or are you watching your carb intake? How many of these carbs do you already incorporate into your diet? Which of these were you surprised to find make the list? Are there any others that you would add to the list?

Share your thoughts, suggestions and questions in the comments below!

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